Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Smoke and Heat Detector Installations

Smoke detector, smoke alarm and heat detector installations are shown.  The majority of the devices are detectors, reporting to monitored fire alarm systems.  Dirt and dust are common elements that activate smoke detectors, nuisance activation is often a function of their operating environment.

Common deficiencies include detector detached from its base/mounting or the intentional or unintentional covering of the device.

The detector below may have a cover or other obstruction on or over it, preventing it from working effectively.


The following detector may be disconnected from its base:

The following photo will show a specific heat detector removed from service:



The following photo shows three (3) heat detectors removed from service.  Physical damage is evident:


The following photo may show a heat detector incorrectly installed, to far below ceiling:

Another view:


The photo below may show a heat detector detached from its base:


The photo below may show a Gentex brand combination (local) smoke (system) heat detector detached from its base:


The next photo may show a detector placed on a wall-sill, the detector may not be in correct placement, see red arrow:


The following photo may show a detector that has been painted on site, this painting may adversely affect detector operation:


Photo below shows smoke sensitivity tester being utilized:



Three photos below show a data from a monitored detector, the detector and the environment in which the detector is operating.  Note, the door to this laundry facility is normally open.  This is a desert environment in the middle east.



The next photo shows both a combination heat/smoke detector (to the left, mounted on the ceiling) and an incorrectly mounted carbon monoxide detector (to the right, hanging by string or other method):

Below, a close up of the incorrectly mounted carbon monoxide detector.  The solid red arrow points to an open battery compartment on this CO detector indicating no battery is present.



Below, a detector is shown in alarm state.  Note the particulate/dust.


Below several detectors are shown with possible particulate contamination. This contamination resulted in nuisance alarms:




Below, a heat detector is shown disconnected from its base:


The following detector may be disconnected from its base:


The detector below may not be installed to detect effectively, this may be a design/install error:

Below is another view:





Below, the smoke detector may not be installed to detect effectively, this may be a design/install error:



Below, a combination local smoke/centrally monitored heat detector is shown, device was tampered with.  It was found covered with foreign material.


The photo below shows the same detector, as above, with the foreign material removed:


The next photo shows the inspector discarding the foreign material:



The next photo may show a detector with non-manufacturer applied paint:

The next photo may show a damaged detector:

The next six (6) photos will show a damaged probe type heat detector that was removed from service:








In next two (2) photos, taken in a mechanical room, a detector may be detached from its mounting base:


The next photo may show a base for a smoke alarm or detector, with the alarm or detector missing:

The next photo may show three (3) smoke alarms, not installed, found in a town-house structure:

The next photo may show a detector with its original manufacturer's plastic protective cover installed.  The detector may not operate correctly in this configuration:

The following two (2) photos may show a smoke alarm mounted on a lighting wire in a structure that has the characteristics of a tent.  The placement may not be optimal.  This may be a design/install error:



The following two (2) photos show a smoke detector in alarm configuration.  Note the dust on top of the detector.


The following two (2) photos may show disconnected wiring on an exterior smoke duct detector.  Note the dust.


The next four (4) photos reportedly show a heat detector with thermal damage.  The thermal damage was a result of improper field testing:





Another possible design/install error is below in two (2) photos, showing a detector mounted on a wall in a theater type setting:



The next photo may show a detector detached from structure:


The next photo may show a detector with a manufacturer's cover installed.  This device may be delayed in reporting smoke.



The next photo may show a detector partially detached from structure:


The next photo may show a design/install error with respect to placement of the detector.  There may be other fire alarm issues at this installation:


The next photo may show a detector with a cover and the detector may be out of placement.  This device may sub-optimally perform.


The photo below may show a detector with a manufacturer's original orange plastic cover installed.  The device may not reach its optimal performance with this cover installed.



The next photo shows a potential design/install error if no drop ceiling is installed.  The detectors are not likely to operate with manufacturer orange covers on them:



Next photo shows a detector possibly detached from its base:



The following two (2) photos show a detector that failed during regularly scheduled testing:



The following two (2) photos may show a smoke detector with foreign material contamination (dust):





The next photo may show a smoke detector test station in a fire tech shop overseas:

The following photo shows a silver hatch, there is a smoke detector in this hatch (chase):


The next photo below, shows a silver hatch where a smoke detector is mounted [in a chase].  The bookshelf is screwed to the wall. 

The photo below shows a fixed rate of rise heat (probe type) detector in alarm state (from testing):

A Fenwal Rate of Rise heat detector removed from service after a failure in a CO-2 protected diesel generator building.  Unit discovered during annual fire alarm testing:

The photo below shows a rate of rise Fenwal heat detector with slight surface corrosion.  Detector installed outside under a dormitory structure:

Photo below may show an unlisted cover protecting a heat detector in a gym:

The next photo will show a smoke detector and open/missing tile in a drop ceiling configuration. The opening in the tile may adversely affect detector operation.

The photo below will show a missing ceiling tile in a fire alarm control panel closet.  Both the fire sprinkler head and the smoke detector will be adversely affected [slowed response] by the open/missing tile:

The following photo shows a damaged heat detector, detector self-disassembled during testing with a heat gun.

The  following two (2) photos show a rate of rise 135 Degree detector that failed in alarm state.  The manufacturer date (not photographed - on the side of the device - 1993) indicates 23 years to failure:


Smoke Alarm, Laundry Facility, Military Installation in Mid-East.  Photo April 2017

Smoke alarm in fire alarm services office, Kuwait, April 2017

Missing ceiling tile (dormitory) may delay operation of smoke and heat detectors


Heat detectors in maintenance hangar may be too far below ceiling:


Smoke Alarm, Fire Alarm Office

Smoke Alarm Install, Military Installation, Persian Gulf 2017




Mall, Kuwait City, 2017


Another view:

Office smoke alarm install:




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